How to Hang Christmas Lights on Stucco

Christmas Lights

Christmas is right around the corner, and for many of you, this means it’s time to start decking the halls with Christmas lights. The stucco on your home may seem like a complex surface to hang Christmas lights on. However, you can take few simple steps to turn them without any hassle successfully. We have compiled three methods for hanging Christmas lights on stucco to help make your decorating process much more manageable. These include double-sided tape, applying glue to each light socket, holding it in place (for about two seconds) and attaching your lights with plastic roof clip nails.

Method One: Using Double-Sided Tape

If you have a Styrofoam backing, and it has not been damaged by installing lights or other methods (e.g., drilling), then there will be an easier way to hang your Christmas lights on stucco. This is where using double-sided tape comes in handy.

Step 1: Clean the Surface

Clean the surface of your home where you plan to install your lights. This will ensure that any dust or debris is removed and you have a clean workspace to get started!

Step 2: Attach the double-Sided Tape

Attach the double-sided tape to your Christmas light bulb socket. This will ensure that they don’t fall off of the stucco or get detached from one another during installation! The more you use, the better (and less messy) it will be.

Step 3: Install the Lights

Press your light against the stucco surface, then remove it. This will leave an indentation on the wall that is ready for installation! The more you use, the better (and less messy) it will be. Save yourself from stress and double-sided tape accidents by purchasing a roll of this stuff at your local hardware store or online.

Method Two: Using Glue

If your Styrofoam backing has been damaged by the installation of lights or other methods (e.g., drilling), then you will need to make some small holes with a hammer and drill before hanging lights. Once you have done this, you can then apply a small bead of glue to the side or top of your first empty bulb socket. This will help hold it in place and prevent any messes from happening on your stucco!

Step 1: Make Small Holes in the Plaster

Tap lightly on your stucco to see if it has Styrofoam backing. You will need to make some small holes in the plaster with a hammer and drill before hanging your lights. With these tips for hanging Christmas lights on stucco, decorating this year will be a breeze!

Step 2: Check If the Plaster Contains Styrofoam

According to hunker.com, you should avoid using hot glue if your stucco is painted. If you don’t know for sure whether or not your plaster contains Styrofoam, you can tap lightly on your stucco to see if it has Styrofoam backing. If so, or if there are any holes in the surface of the plaster that would indicate a drill was used to hang lights before, then you will need to make some small holes with a hammer and drill before hanging your lights.

Step 3: Install the String of Lights

Remove the light bulbs before installing your strings of lights. Do not hang Christmas tree lights up too high, as they will make it difficult for you and future homeowners to see once the holidays are over. For best results, we recommend using an outdoor-rated stringing wire. The insulation in these wires will protect the lights from moisture (keeping them dry) and prevents light bulbs from getting hot enough to cause a fire.

Step 4: Use Bead Glue to The Side

Apply a small bead of glue to the side (or top) of your first empty bulb socket. This will help hold it in place to hang it with ease and avoid making any messes when installing them (they may drip onto the stucco). Hold the light socket to the wall for a couple of seconds. This will cause an indentation on your stucco (the surface of the plaster), which you want for optimum adhesion. Continue attaching the light socket to your home. This will help keep you organized and allow for optimum adhesion. The more securely attached, the less likely it is that a light bulb will get loose or fall out when someone bumps into them! Soften the glue with the heat gun to remove the light socket. Once you are done decorating for Christmas, give your stucco a good scrub, and everything should come right off.

Method Three: Attaching Your Lights with Plastic Roof Clip Nails.

According to saguaroranchrealestate.com, this method is for those who do not want to use tape or glue! If you have a Styrofoam backing, and it has not been damaged by installing lights or other methods (e.g., drilling), then there will be an easier way to hang your Christmas lights on stucco. This is where using plastic roof clip nails come in handy! The plastic roof clip nails will provide maximum adhesion and make it possible for you to stay organized! You can use Hang clips on the roofline and slide them along, pushing up against each other until you reach your desired length. You can also put a pin in the centre of where you want to start and then work out from there on either side. This will allow for more control over spacing as well.

Step 1: Use Screw Hooks to Hang the Lights

Use the Screw hooks into the stucco and hangs lights on them. This will allow for a more permanent fixture but may take some time to do correctly.

Step 2: Use Zip Ties to Attach the Lights

If you are using an outdoor-rated stringing wire and your stucco surface is not too uneven, then zip ties may be an excellent option for attaching lights to it. You can easily find these at any hardware store or online. Hang them higher than usual. Most people hang their Christmas lights close to eye level, but if you’re hanging them on stucco, then it would be best to hang the lights at least six feet above the ground. This will ensure that the weight of your light string doesn’t put too much pressure on anyone’s area and cause a crack in the stucco.

Conclusion

There are many ways to hang your lights, so whichever you find easiest is the best for you. The most important thing is that they’re up and lit.

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