How to Care for Brass Button Plants

Brass Button Plants

Brass Button (Cotula coronopifolia) is a small flowering plant that gets its name from the bright yellow, button-shaped flowers it produces. According to Wikipedia, the plant is native to Africa and New Zealand. Still, it has been introduced to other parts of the world, where it often grows in wet, muddy areas such as marshes, estuaries, and beaches. While it is considered an invasive species in some areas, its spread is relatively slow. Caring for brass button plants is easy, as they are tolerant of growing conditions and are not susceptible to many pests or diseases. With a bit of attention, these plants can provide a splash of color to any landscape. This guide will teach you everything you need to know about growing and caring for brass button plants.

Tips on How to Care for Brass Button Plants

Caring for brass button plants is easy, as they are tolerant of a wide range of growing conditions and are not susceptible to many pests or diseases. With a little attention, these plants can provide a splash of color to any landscape. Here are some tips on how to care for brass button plants:

Light

Brass button plants prefer bright, indirect sunlight but tolerate some direct sun. If you live in a hot climate, it’s best to protect your plant from the midday sun to prevent scorching.

Water

Even though the plant isn’t drought-tolerant, it’s important not to overwater your brass button plant. Allow the soil to slightly dry out between watering. Water it less often in winter when the plant is dormant. Over-watering can lead to root rot, so be careful not to overwater your plant.

Fertilizer

Feed brass button plants are shallow-rooted. That means the best fertilization routine is once a year during the growing season with a balanced succulent fertilizer, according to Wisconsin Horticulture, Division of Extension. Avoid fertilizing in winter when the plant is dormant.

Soil

Brass button plants prefer well-drained, rich and loamy soil. You can use a succulent commercial mix or make your own by mixing equal parts of sand and potting soil.

Potting and Repotting

Use a pot that is only slightly larger than the root ball of your plant. Brass button plants do not like to be pot-bound, so you may need to repot every year or two. When repotting, handle the plant carefully as the stem is fragile and can break easily.

Pests and Diseases

Brass button plants are susceptible to mealy bugs, aphids, and other pests. Inspect your plant regularly and treat it with an insecticide if necessary. Root rot can occur if the plant is overwatered, so only water when the soil is dry.

How to Grow Brass Button Plants: Step by Step Guide

Growing Brass Button plants is easy, and they make great houseplants. Here is a step by step guide on how to grow Brass Button plants:

Step 1: Pick a spot

Choose a location that receives bright, indirect sunlight. If you live in a hot climate, it’s best to protect your plant from the midday sun to prevent scorching.

Step 2: Get the planting area or pot ready

Prepare the pot or planting area by adding a layer of well-draining soil. Brass button plants prefer sandy soil, so you can either use a succulent commercial mix or make your own by mixing equal parts sand and potting soil.

Step 3: Water the soil

Water the soil until it is moist but not soggy. Allow the top inch of soil to dry out between watering. Water the plants less often in winter when the plant is dormant.

Step 4: Plant the Bruss Button

Place your plant in the pot or planting area and backfill with soil. Gently press the soil around the plant to secure it in place.

Step 5: Fertilization

Fertilize your plant once a month during the growing season with a balanced succulent fertilizer. Avoid fertilizing in winter when the plant is dormant.

Step 6: Post care

Inspect your plant regularly for pests and diseases. Treat with an insecticide if necessary. Root rot can occur if the plant is overwatered, so only water when the soil is dry.

Growing Brass Button Plants in a Container

Brass button plants are well-suited to growing in containers. They prefer bright, indirect light and well-draining soil. Water the plant only when the soil is dry, and fertilize once a month during the growing season. Be sure to use a pot that is only slightly larger than the root ball, as these plants don’t like to be pot-bound. You may need to re-pot your plant every year or two.

Varieties of Brass Buttons

There are two main types of brass button plants: Cotyledon tomentosa and Kalanchoe thyrsiflora. Cotyledon tomentosa, also known as bear’s paw or woolly cotyledon, is a low-growing succulent with thick, furry leaves. It’s native to South Africa and can grow up to 12 inches tall. Kalanchoe thyrsiflora, also known as flapshed kalanchoe or chandelier plant, is a taller succulent that can grow up to 3 feet tall. It’s native to Madagascar and has long, arching leaves covered in white fuzz.

How to Prune Brass Buttons

Pruning is an essential part of plant care, as it helps to promote healthy growth and prevent disease. When pruning brass button plants, use sharp, clean shears. Make cuts just above a leaf node, taking care not to damage the stem. You can also propagate new plants from stem cuttings. To do this, cut a 4-inch piece of stem from the plant and allow it to callus for a few days. Once the cut end has dried out, you can plant it in well-draining soil.

When to Prune Brass Buttons

You can prune brass button plants at any time of year, but they typically don’t need much pruning. If you notice that your plant is getting leggy or out of shape, you can trim it back to encourage new growth. You can also prune away any dead or damaged leaves.

Is It Easy to Propagate a Brass Button Plant?

Yes, brass button plants are easily propagated from stem cuttings. Take a cutting from the plant and allow it to be callous over for a few days before planting in well-drained soil.

What Type of Pot is Best for a Brass Button Plant?

A brass button plant should be potted in a pot that is only slightly larger than the root ball, 5-9 inches. The plant does not like to be pot-bound, so you may need to repot every year or two. When repotting, handle the plant carefully as the stem is fragile and can break easily.

Conclusion

Brass button plants are easy to care for and make a great addition to any succulent collection. These plants prefer bright, indirect light and well-draining soil. Water only when the soil is dry, and fertilize once a month during the growing season. Be sure to use a pot that is only slightly larger than the root ball, as these plants don’t like to be pot-bound. You may need to re-pot your plant every year or two. Cuttings can be easily propagated from stem cuttings.

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