10 Benefits from Using Laminate Wood Flooring

Your flooring is one of the most important aspects of your home. Not only do you want it to look good, but you want it to be functional and easy to keep up with. Your flooring choice should take into consideration several things, one of which is, your lifestyle. It makes sense to install flooring that works with the daily activities that go on in your home and the type of traffic your floors will be enduring. Wood laminate floors have become a popular choice for many homeowners for multiple reasons. If you are looking to put new flooring in your home, then here are 10 benefits from using wood laminate flooring.

Appealing look 

Everyone knows that wood floors are a classy look for a home. They can make any home look richer, neater and more attractive than some other types of flooring, like vinyl. They can also look so much like genuine wood floors that someone just looking at it, may never know it is laminate. There are many choices in the laminate wood types that you can find the one that has the look and the quality options you desire.

Affordable

One thing that attracts many people to the laminate wood flooring as opposed to genuine wood, is the difference in cost. If you are on a budget that won’t permit genuine wood floors, laminate wood lets you get the look of genuine wood without breaking the bank. Laminate wood can, on average, actually cost about 50% less than real hardwood. This is the perfect solution for those who want both, the look of hardwood, and a budget-friendly flooring choice. At this big of price difference, it leaves you with more money to be able to spend elsewhere on your home projects.

Environmentally friendly

While you still get the look and many of the same benefits that a wood floor gives you, one big difference is the impact on the environment between the two. Laminate wood flooring does not use the natural resources that that natural wood floors obviously has to use. There will not be any fallen trees for the making of your laminate floors, and there is an added bonus in that most laminate wood flooring is made with about 75% of pre-consumer recycled waste, which only adds to the benefits that the laminate has for the environment.

Easy maintenance

Natural wood floors are not spill or moisture friendly. When exposed to any water or moisture, they can warp or crack. Laminate wood is a good choice for families with pets and kids when it comes to easy maintenance and clean up. The laminate’s outer layer is made up of a material that does not allow fluid or moisture to seep into it, so damage can occur. You also will only need to vacuum and sweep for regular maintenance, but no waxing or polishing is required. If a spill occurs, simply wipe it up when it occurs.

Doesn’t fade

Most other flooring types are susceptible to fading from sunlight exposure. Over time, carpet, vinyl and natural hardwood can all start to fade under the sun’s glare from a window or skylight. Laminate wood flooring, on the other hand, does not fade, and is often seen in living spaces that are exposed to a lot of natural light. You won’t see signs of discoloration or sun damage that can happen with other flooring types.

Dog and child friendly

Got kids or pets? Most people worry about any type of flooring and the effects their kids or pets will have on it. They can be very hard on flooring and cause damage that is hard to repair or replace. People that have kids and/or pets, will often install laminate in areas that are high traffic areas for their kids and pets because it is scratch resistant and stain resistant. It is very durable and where hardwood will show wear over time, laminate is much more resistant to high traffic.

Termite safe

Nope, you won’t have termites with laminate wood. There is no need to worry about a termite infestation that can cost thousands of dollars in repairs when there is not real wood involved. Wood-boring insects are attracted to genuine wood flooring and can cause severe damage if they are not caught and treated in a timely manner. With laminate wood, you can put that worry out of mind and just enjoy your floor that looks like the real thing.

Easily adapts to sub-flooring

Laminate flooring does not adhere to subflooring which is a big bonus for those who worry about the installation of the laminate on the type of flooring they have. It is extremely adaptable and simply lays on top of the flooring or subflooring already down, so long as it is level, clean and dry. No matter what type of wood laminate you choose, it will install and co-exist with your current flooring.

Hypo-allergenic

Because laminate wood flooring does not trap dust and dirt particles like carpet can, this is often a good type of flooring for people with allergies. There is an underlayment for the planks that barricades any moisture from getting under the flooring and protects it from damage. It is also a protection against mold and spore growth, which is an allergenic.

Styles

There are a lot of choices when it comes to laminate woods. You can choose from different types of wood styles, from cherry to oak, and more. There are also different thicknesses of wood laminates and plank styles. You can also choose from: smooth, embossed or textured, and distressed or hand scraped, surface finishes. Most flooring companies also give you a choice in the type of grade rating you need, depending on the amount of foot traffic you get.

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